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Certification for Technical Leadership

  • 27 May 2020
  • 6 replies
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Hi all, 

Just wanted to ask if someone have any idea about topic.

 

I’m technical lead in IT and I’m planning to go on the path of managemet. I’m not sure exact direction, but product management, engineering management and process management sounds quite interesting for me. 

 

So I’m able to invest to some widely recogizable certificates for my future career. Of course I’m taking coursera courses, but I’d like to do more. In my homeland people don’t value certificates mcuh, so I’m quite new for this Professional Certification World. 

 

So I’d like to request your ideas/recommendations on certificates I might obtain. I understand I can obtain some kind of Agile/Scrum Master certificates, maybe some Project Management Professional certficate, but this is more related to PM, not Technical Leadership. My main aim is career improvement in terms of having more (confirmed) value as candidate on the market. 

 

So… any recommendations, ideas? :)

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Best answer by peteok 27 May 2020, 17:28

Welcome to the field! I made the transition from lead/architect to tech manager a decade ago, and coach people making the switch now. The certification space can be confusing when you get started, and a lot of people will give you recommendations about things that they like. 

From the hiring perspective, 2 providers of certifications mean something in the field: Scrum Alliance and Scaled Agile. The rest are nice-to-have. People in the field have strong feelings about other programs, and those programs are also of high quality. BUT, hiring (or at least screening) is usually done by people who don’t know the field, unfortunately. So they only know what they’ve been told, and that information lags behind reality.

Regardless of the management job you take, take 1 of the following 2 classes: Certified ScrumMaster (CSM) by Scrum Alliance, or Leading SAFe. (If you work in a small team, go Scrum Alliance. If you work in large enterprises with lots of teams, take the SAFe course instead.) These days it’s just expected. If you don’t have one of these two often your resume will just go in the trash, because everybody has one of these now. If you want to get into the product side (Design, UX, etc.) also take 1 of the following: Certified Scrum Product Owner (CSPO) by Scrum Alliance or SAFe Product Owner/Product Manager (POPM).

After that there is ICAgile, LeSS, Scrum of Scrums, and others, plus a bunch more Advanced Scrum classes at Scrum Alliance, and advanced classes at Scaled Agile. At that point it’s really up to which content speaks to you the best. Just get a CSM or Leading SAFe certification first. 

It used to be that getting your “PMP” from PMI was a big deal, but the folks who created the PMP are so far behind now, that getting a PMP now is actually seen as a ding against you. (If someone got a PMP years ago, it’s fine, but getting one now is what’s frowned upon.)

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Userlevel 1
Badge +1

Welcome to the field! I made the transition from lead/architect to tech manager a decade ago, and coach people making the switch now. The certification space can be confusing when you get started, and a lot of people will give you recommendations about things that they like. 

From the hiring perspective, 2 providers of certifications mean something in the field: Scrum Alliance and Scaled Agile. The rest are nice-to-have. People in the field have strong feelings about other programs, and those programs are also of high quality. BUT, hiring (or at least screening) is usually done by people who don’t know the field, unfortunately. So they only know what they’ve been told, and that information lags behind reality.

Regardless of the management job you take, take 1 of the following 2 classes: Certified ScrumMaster (CSM) by Scrum Alliance, or Leading SAFe. (If you work in a small team, go Scrum Alliance. If you work in large enterprises with lots of teams, take the SAFe course instead.) These days it’s just expected. If you don’t have one of these two often your resume will just go in the trash, because everybody has one of these now. If you want to get into the product side (Design, UX, etc.) also take 1 of the following: Certified Scrum Product Owner (CSPO) by Scrum Alliance or SAFe Product Owner/Product Manager (POPM).

After that there is ICAgile, LeSS, Scrum of Scrums, and others, plus a bunch more Advanced Scrum classes at Scrum Alliance, and advanced classes at Scaled Agile. At that point it’s really up to which content speaks to you the best. Just get a CSM or Leading SAFe certification first. 

It used to be that getting your “PMP” from PMI was a big deal, but the folks who created the PMP are so far behind now, that getting a PMP now is actually seen as a ding against you. (If someone got a PMP years ago, it’s fine, but getting one now is what’s frowned upon.)

Userlevel 4
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Hi, what do you say? I don’t understand your field. What do you want to do? What objects do you need to manipulate?

SQL and Business?

Try UML, not many courses here but useful skill, mindset. Bye

 

PS - try to see some courses about Manufacturing, it’s usually CAD related but maybe you like it 

 

 
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Anastasiia, I work in the legal field.  I completed the Project Management Specialization series a few years ago to gain a different perspective on scheduling and processes of team driven projects.  I do not plan to change careers or to pursue that specialization further, but It helped me understand the bigger picture and some of the finer points.  

Badge +1

Welcome to the field! I made the transition from lead/architect to tech manager a decade ago, and coach people making the switch now. The certification space can be confusing when you get started, and a lot of people will give you recommendations about things that they like. 

From the hiring perspective, 2 providers of certifications mean something in the field: Scrum Alliance and Scaled Agile. The rest are nice-to-have. People in the field have strong feelings about other programs, and those programs are also of high quality. BUT, hiring (or at least screening) is usually done by people who don’t know the field, unfortunately. So they only know what they’ve been told, and that information lags behind reality.

Regardless of the management job you take, take 1 of the following 2 classes: Certified ScrumMaster (CSM) by Scrum Alliance, or Leading SAFe. (If you work in a small team, go Scrum Alliance. If you work in large enterprises with lots of teams, take the SAFe course instead.) These days it’s just expected. If you don’t have one of these two often your resume will just go in the trash, because everybody has one of these now. If you want to get into the product side (Design, UX, etc.) also take 1 of the following: Certified Scrum Product Owner (CSPO) by Scrum Alliance or SAFe Product Owner/Product Manager (POPM).

After that there is ICAgile, LeSS, Scrum of Scrums, and others, plus a bunch more Advanced Scrum classes at Scrum Alliance, and advanced classes at Scaled Agile. At that point it’s really up to which content speaks to you the best. Just get a CSM or Leading SAFe certification first. 

It used to be that getting your “PMP” from PMI was a big deal, but the folks who created the PMP are so far behind now, that getting a PMP now is actually seen as a ding against you. (If someone got a PMP years ago, it’s fine, but getting one now is what’s frowned upon.)

 

Thank you so much for such big and informative answer!

I was thinking about Scrum certifications and I was wondering about different certifications providers. Now I have really good understanding what to follow. I think your answer will help other too because it give great insight into the area.

Badge +1

Hi, what do you say? I don’t understand your field. What do you want to do? What objects do you need to manipulate?

SQL and Business?

Try UML, not many courses here but useful skill, mindset. Bye

 

PS - try to see some courses about Manufacturing, it’s usually CAD related but maybe you like it 

 

Hi, 

Thank you for answer. :) I’m from Software Engineering field, I’m technical. I’m looking for more management/business-related certifications. So I don’t really need courses related to engineering, UML and other meta-languages. :)

Badge +1

Anastasiia, I work in the legal field.  I completed the Project Management Specialization series a few years ago to gain a different perspective on scheduling and processes of team driven projects.  I do not plan to change careers or to pursue that specialization further, but It helped me understand the bigger picture and some of the finer points.  

Thank you Peggy,

I’m checking out specializations here as well. Actually when I  was studying in university I got quite a lot of courses related to PM area. This is quite interesting, but here in the UAE people are really caring about certifications. This is why I’m feeling coursera courses are not enough at all. 

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