Use These Strategies to Shift to Online Teaching | Coursera Community
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Use These Strategies to Shift to Online Teaching

  • 18 March 2020
  • 6 replies
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Use These Strategies to Shift to Online Teaching
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  • Community Manager
  • 1376 replies

A lot of people around the world are in a new situation right now – trying to figure out how to effectively teach online for the first time. 

We want to help!

Coursera’s Teaching & Learning team has put together a practical guide for teachers: Moving online: What you can implement now

If you are an educator who has experience teaching online – whether that’s elementary school or university classes – please share your own advice for online teaching here. Let’s help each other!


6 replies

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I simply wanted to share this great article that talks about a concept that has really helped me in my work as an online educator: access. https://www.iddblog.org/videoconferencing-alternatives-how-low-bandwidth-teaching-will-save-us-all/

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I would also suggest making the class asynchronous. This allows students who don’t have a fast or reliable internet connection to learn at their own pace.

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I would also suggest making the class asynchronous. This allows students who don’t have a fast or reliable internet connection to learn at their own pace.

As we are talking about real-time interaction, what about timezone mismatch ?

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I would also suggest making the class asynchronous. This allows students who don’t have a fast or reliable internet connection to learn at their own pace.

As we are talking about real-time interaction, what about timezone mismatch ?

 

Yes, we on Coursera leverage quite a bit of async content to help our busy learners engage at both a time and a place that works best for them. From pre-recorded videos, to quizzes, peer review assignments, and even discussion prompts, we try to help learners gain new understanding from instructors, share with their peers, and test their knowledge, all at their own pace. 

 

Amidst this global crisis, instructors are having to transition in-person courses to online, many looking for ways to recreate their classroom discussions, simulations, and group work. That’s where the sync sessions can be especially useful and something we’ve found degree students on Coursera enjoy as well, whether instant messaging via Slack or video conferencing via Zoom. With those synchronous needs most salient for many teachers at the moment, we wanted to provide our learnings in that arena on what instructors can implement now.

 

Thank you for engaging with the Coursera Community and looking forward to learning from your move to online teaching as well :) 

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I have a LMS for my domain but I feel so overwhelmed with learning how to create the lesson videos, adding them to each course etc that i just don't know where to start. 

I feel I need more training or knowledge on how everything works before I mess everything up. I use wordpress (BTW)

 

 

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I have a LMS for my domain but I feel so overwhelmed with learning how to create the lesson videos, adding them to each course etc that i just don't know where to start. 

I feel I need more training or knowledge on how everything works before I mess everything up. I use wordpress (BTW)

 

Hello @MUSEJAY - yes, being overwhelmed is completely expected during these chaotic times while also, all of sudden, having to move your teaching content online.

In general, I have been heartened by the many recent articles online reminding teachers that we do not need to do everything perfectly right now. Instead of the time and resources that course teams often have allocated for creating new content on Coursera, we are currently asking instructors to move everything online without that level of support or training - plus, these lessons, as you pointed out, were all originally designed for an in-person classroom. So, my first point would be: you are doing a wonderful job. There’s no reason to try to do it all right now - let’s focus on what we can accomplish and take one piece at a time!

Secondly, I would say that starting with the basics can be beneficial. Let’s return to what learning objectives you want to make sure your students are meeting and then figure out how you can assess those remotely. Can an exam or quiz be modified for virtual completion? Can a project be written or recorded and then submitted for your review? Next, we can consider how best to teach those skills. It’s completely understandable that you and most other instructors right now cannot make fully-produced videos, so scheduling live sessions with your students and recording them is a great way to engage directly with your learners. Also, posting these sessions allows for others’ later review or watching if they were not able to make your synchronous time.

All in all, parents and students are grateful for this immense work you’re putting in and please be kind to yourself as we navigate these new platforms together. Thank you for all you’re doing to provide high-quality learning to your students, especially in these unprecedented circumstances.

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