Holi Hai! The Festival of Love and Colours! | Coursera Community
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Holi Hai! The Festival of Love and Colours!

  • 19 March 2019
  • 7 replies
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March marks the beginning of spring in India and brings with it one of the most joyful, exuberant, and colourful Hindu festivals - Holi. In 2019, Holi will be celebrated on March 20-21 across the Indian sub-continent and by millions of its diaspora all across the globe. The Express put together some pictures of the celebrations here: Incredible Images of the Holi Festival of Colours

Visit Holi: a Joyful and Colourful Festival to read all about the holiday, including festive traditions, foods, myths, and even thematic Bollywood songs. You can also read more about the mythological, cultural and social significance of Holi.

If you celebrate Holi, what are your favorite traditions, foods, and songs?

7 replies

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Nice post @Saumya Joshi

Yes i'll celebrate Holi every year. Below are my favorite foods, songs & Color

1:Phirnis and Holi go hand in hand. Right? The smell of the kasoras dipped in water. Ah! Bliss.
How do you like your phirni?

2; Bhaang is a popular intoxicating drink prepared during the festival of Holi. From last 5 years I've successfully managed to drink this to have more fun😀
3: My all time favorite track of #AmitabhBachan from the movie' Silsila '... " Rang Barse Bheege Chunar wali Rang Barse! I go crazy on dance floor when ever this track is played🎼

4: No color will compete in front of "Gulal" That is why i think Holi looks more colorful😍


Have a wonderful Holi everyone, Play safe and enjoy core!
Cheers
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I've wanted to visit India for a very long time now. Seeing the joyful pictures from Holi (@Saumya Joshi!) and hearing about the food and music (@Kalyan – thanks for the song recommendation – I'm listening to it now!) makes me want to be there even more. I think perhaps I lived in India in a previous life ... it all feels so familiar to me.

One question: how do the colors stay so vibrant (rather than mixing together and becoming grey)?!
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The Guardian just released it's own pictures from this year's Holi celebrations across India. Take a look - Holi: a Festival of Colours in Pictures 🙂
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I've wanted to visit India for a very long time now. Seeing the joyful pictures from Holi (@Saumya Joshi!) and hearing about the food and music (@Kalyan – thanks for the song recommendation – I'm listening to it now!) makes me want to be there even more. I think perhaps I lived in India in a previous life ... it all feels so familiar to me.

One question: how do the colors stay so vibrant (rather than mixing together and becoming grey)?!

@Laura : Holi’s hues came from plant sources: Green was made from ground neem leaves (Azadirachta indica), and yellow and red came from turmeric (Curcuma longa), Rajamathi explains. A popular spice, turmeric is bright yellow at neutral pH thanks to the molecule curcumin. When treated with a base, such as calcium hydroxide (also known as lime), curcumin turns red. Other plant-based colors, used either as pastes, as powders, or in water, included henna leaves as another shade of green; marigolds or chrysanthemums as yellow; flame of the forest (Butea monosperma), pomegranate, or red sandalwood as red; indigo as blue; and charcoal as black.

In modern times, with more sophisticated synthetic chemistry, the colors became brighter—and in some cases more toxic. Some of the more benign, modern Holi colors, called gulal in Hindi when made in powder form, are a mixture of more than 95% cornstarch blended with food-, drug-, and cosmetic-grade dyes. These pigments, known as FD&C colors in the U.S., are the same ones that bring a rainbow of colors to candy😄
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Whoa I love how detailed your response is, @Kalyan! Thank you for taking the time to share this. I really hope I can experience Holi in India one day ... though I would prefer the non-toxic, plant-based colors. 😁
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Whoa I love how detailed your response is, @Kalyan! Thank you for taking the time to share this. I really hope I can experience Holi in India one day ... though I would prefer the non-toxic, plant-based colors. 😁

@Laura Thank you for kind words. It means a lot☺! I wish your dream come true very soon.

Cheers.
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hmm india is great and a land of many festivals everyone should once visit india

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