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Australia: The Land of Sunshine


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I’m currently a student in Australia. I come from an Anglo-Saxon background, and my family has been in Australia right from the first colonisation in 1788.

Australia is a very multicultural country and is slowly losing its own culture. However, there are still some things which are still considered Australian.

Some foods which are Australian include:
  • Vegemite (people put it on toast, in sauces, and even on meat)
  • Meat Pies (New Zealand also has these)
  • Pavlova (named in honour of a Russian dancer)
  • Lamington (a sponge cake variation)
On Australia Day, we often eat these foods in honour of our Australian heritage.

In Austraia, we also have a wide variety of plants and animals. Some more famous animal examples include:
Here is one of our national poems written by Dorothea Mackellar.


This tells the story of Australia's dryness, but beauty.

I've been told by others around the world that the people of Australia are laid-back and friendly, and this is mainly the case in country areas. If you have any questions, I'm more than happy to tell you more!

Find out more about Cultural Connection Week and view other people’s posts about their cultures here.

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Thanks, Lillian for sharing. I visited Australia as a tourist and could cover only Sydney, Melbourn and Cairns. I tried Vegemite there as it was recommended by a lot of people.
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Did you enjoy vegemite, @Namrata Tejwani? I know that many people who are not used to it don't like it that much. 🙂
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Hi @Lillian it's lovely to see another Australian here!
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@Lillian you are right, I did not like it that much, for people like me (vegeterian) food is one of the important concern while traveling abroad. I mainly survived on muffins, greek yoghurt, burrito, subway and milk. My love for travelling has helped me survive even on cookies with coffee as meal. Btw, I liked coffee in Melbourn, from some local vendor.
Thank you, Lillian. Joeys are so cute in their mother's pouch when they try to visit the outside world with those curious eyes. 👀
(I wanted to use a kangaroo emoji, too, but it seems we don't have it in this collection. 🙂)
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Is there anything you wanted to add about Australia, @Pat B? It's lovely to see you here too!

You can get a lot of different foods in Australia, @Namrata Tejwani, especially in Melbourne and other cities. How long ago was it that you visited Australi?

Yes, @Maryam, the joeys are very cute. Once, we ended up having to look after one whose mother had died. He was so cute. 🙂
@Lillian , thank you for such a comprehensive look at your culture!
You represent your country well, being such a friendly and easy to discuss things with person.
When you cared for that joey, what did it eat?
Were you able to successfully integrate it back to its natural habitat?
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@Judith, we fed the joey milk through a syringe kind of thing. Unfortunately, we had to go away, and he passed away at a friend's house. I think they had a cold night, and he couldn't handle it. It was so sad, but I guess that's the way of life. I am grateful, though, for the opportunity to spend a few weeks with him. It was such a special time for us.

Thank you for the compliments, Judith. You are so easy to discuss things with, too.
@Lillian Thank you for sharing this with us. It's a sad ending, but without the mother, this poor baby had little chance of survival. You did what you could and got to experience something so special.
Thank you for the compliment too.
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Hi @Lillian your description of Australian culture was wonderful! I don't have much to add.

I also come from an Anglo-Saxon background, with my ancestors arriving in Australia in the 1800s and early 1900s. As a child growing up in the 1960s, our food was very British with meat and three vegetables being a typical dinner. Takeaway was fish (in batter) and chips, or a meat pie as Lillian@Lillian mentioned. We even had Chinese takeaway once!

Australia has become very multicultural. I tasted my first pizza in the early 1970s, with Italian restaurants starting to appear. American imports such as KFC and Macdonalds also showed up during the 1970s. Now, we can choose from a multitude of cuisines from all around the world.

Although our National Anthem is "Advance Australia Fair" (written by a Scotsman), many Australians relate to "Waltzing Matilda" by AB (Banjo) Paterson. Guaranteed to bring on nostalgia for any Aussies overseas!

As well as Australia Day, we celebrate sporting events and top sportsmen and women may be referred to as "heroes" in the media. Australian Rules grand final day and cricket (especially against England) are popular. Soccer (football in many countries) is less popular, but is building up, especially children's teams.

The Melbourne Cup is a horse race on the first Tuesday in November and is called "The race that stops a nation." It's a public holiday in Melbourne, but many workplaces all around the country have a radio or television tuned to the race or close their doors for the afternoon.
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@Lillian, I visited Australia in 2017 summers. Typically the trip is short, covering a few cities in short span of time (2 weeks max). I could cover only Melbourn, Sydney and Cairns. Yes, food choices are aplenty but deciding what to eat is a bit tricky, especially while travelling. I recall, after Sydney harbour bridge climb, we opted for pizza dinner (Dominos) near Opera house. We eat it here as well. But all 3 of us got food poisoning in the middle of night. Being a medical doctor I could manage it but it is still scary, falling sick in foreign land.
So typically, I stick to options that are safe, cookies, coffee is, therefore, my safest bet, not being a foodie helps me go for working meals.
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That's terrible that you got food poisoning, @Namrata Tejwani. Did you have a favourite city out of Melbourne, Sydney, and Cairns? I haven't actually been to Cairns. 🙂

Thanks for the contributions, @Pat B. I was reading your comments and thinking, 'Yep, yep, that sounds right.' 🙂
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@Lillian, while we plan a trip, we try to add slow paced part as well, so Cairns was that. Very laid back yet beautiful and relaxing. Sydney was my favourite, as I enjoyed climbing harbour bridge at twilight, for me it was a once in a lifetime experience. Otherwise it reminded me of fast paced life back home in Mumbai.
I personally think if it comes to nature, nothing like S. Newzealand. It is breathtakingly beautiful.
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@Namrata Tejwani what bad luck with the food poisoning! Next month, I plan to climb the Story Bridge in Brisbane. Sydney and Melbourne are busy cities! I much prefer the countryside and the beaches. We don't have spectacular mountains, but our coastline is awesome.
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Yes, I have been to Southern New Zealand. The mountains are breathtaking, @Namrata Tejwani. I visited Sydney a year ago for the first time. It was very nice, but it was also raining.

Yes, I also prefer the countryside, @Pat B. It's much more peaceful and pleasant. The cities are too fast-paced for my liking.
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Great, @Lillian. I particularly liked Franz Joseph (view from a helicopter)


Queenstown


Sydney, I liked because of activities (harbour bridge climb, Tower eye- edge experience). Since my current city is also fast-paced, I actually felt at home there.
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Gorgeous photos, @Namrata Tejwani! Here are a couple of Australia:


Uluru


Caloundra, Queensland
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Wow,@Pat B . Australia is beautiful as nature is preserved. I have been to Queenstown, New Zealand.
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A sad fact about Australia is that the cultures of the original inhabitants - Australian Aborigines - are in a constant struggle to survive, because so many people from other countries now live here. You can learn about Aboriginal culture in many places around Australia, including at Uluru, where artwork, legends, and sacred sites are preserved.

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@Pat B original inhabitants are being displaced by immigrant/ migrant population all over the world, sad and true. And this migrant population is also an original inhabitant of some place and moved out for various reasons, being displaced, looking for a better opportunity, etc are just two reasons.
I personally feel that at no point in human history, people stopped relocating (forced / out of choice). Of course, the culture needs to be preserved but cultures have evolved as well out of this movement. People are more open to other cultures than ever before. I saw this Maori art and performance


And Pamagirri aboriginals performance during my trip.

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@Lillian
Why do you call Australia as land of sunshine? It is very hot there or dry as desert
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@Zannah Zakariya Goni, Australia is a very dry country, especially on the mainland. Rain can be quite scarce sometimes, and most days are sunny. At the moment, though, some part of Australia are in a drought and others are flooded. This is due to the broad range of climates and the large area Australia occupies. All in all, though, Australia is a very sunny country. It's not always hot, but it is sunny.
@Lillian , what kinds of vegetation grows best in your climate?
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Trees grow very well where I am, @Judith. We mainly have wattles, eucalyptus, and different types of gum trees. This is an image of the flowers of a golden wattle tree. This is actually our national flower.http://www.anbg.gov.au/images/photo_cd/301610241330/028_2.jpg
Grasses and other plants can also grow well, but this varies in different areas. For example, in the wetter areas, the grasses are very lush and green, but grass struggles to grow in the dryer areas. In answer to your question, I would say that trees grow the best.
@Lillian, your national flower tree is beautiful! How long do the flowers last?
What about growing food? Are any vegetables grown locally?
no wonder you raise sheep with all that lush grass it must feed them well! 😀

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