How Do You Listen to Music? | Coursera Community
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How Do You Listen to Music?

  • 18 August 2019
  • 9 replies
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  • Music Community Leader
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When I was growing up in the 50’s - 60’s, I listened to the radio all the time. Most teens owned those little transistor radios which we carried everywhere. If I heard a song I liked I would buy the 45 record. I also had a tape recorder collection. These transitioned into huge boom boxes and CD’s became popular . MTV was the source to listen to for the latest music.
We were encouraged to do away with our records and tapes. Phonographs and tape recorders had become obsolete.
YouTube became a good source to find and listen to music. CD’s seem to be loosing their popularity in favor of downloading MP3s. I still actively buy CDs but wonder when they will become obsolete.

How do you listen to your music?
How do you find new music to listen to and enjoy?

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I listen to music on radio or Spotify.
Every time I read a review of an artist or a LP, I do a search for it and listen to a least a couple of tracks.
It has been a long time since I purchased any music and I don't have any paid subscriptions either.
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Mostly I listen on line -- either internet radio or spotify. I haven't bought any music in years. I prefer live concerts when I can get to them. I'm retired, love classical, folk, jazz and blues. When my kids were little, I let them pick the radio station when they were in the car with me, provided they all agreed 🙂. They had varying musical tastes, but they all preferred NOT to listen to NPR. My oldest quickly came up with what they all thought was a fair scheme (he now works for IBM), and I became familiar with rap and hip-hop. At the time, I was thus more conversant with "current" pop artists than I am now that they are grown.

In retrospect, I appreciate the chance I had to extend my musical horizons.
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@Judith I smiled at your reference to the 60's and growing up. I had one of those small transistors and I would have it next to me at night, when I went to bed. I would sit in our kitchen, during the evening, listening to the top 40 station. I recently cleaned out my late father's house. I had a final count of 329, 45's, mostly from the 60's and a few from the early 70's, that I found in the basement. I still listen to the radio, either classic rock or oldies stations. If one of my favorite artists comes out with a new CD, I buy it.
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I had a little AM transistor radio when I was a kid, got it from the Camera Bar in the store my mom worked in then for a couple of bucks when they were closing them out because no one wanted just AM anymore -FM was the in thing, this was about '71 and I was about 7. It was my favorite thing, outside of my mom's stereo, for the next several years until I was gifted with a small stereo of my own by my mom trying to keep my hands off of hers and her records at about age 10.
The radio only knew how to play country music, I made sure of that, but when i started buying albums on my own, i think The first several i bought were the soundtrack to 2001: A Space Odyssey, Neil Diamond's Taproot Manuscript, Kris Kristofferson's Silver Tongued Devil And I and Simon and Garfunkle's Wednesday Morning 3 am.
I skipped the eight-track craze, but eventually started buying cassettes out of necessity. I bought a Walkman in the early '90s that I carried throughout college and didn't actually start buying in to CDs until the late '90s.
I continued to buy CDs until high speed internet came in and came down enough in price to be affordable, at which point I jumped onto the digital music bandwagon.
I still have a few vinyl LPs that I have bought more as collector's items than anything, a few stray cassette tapes that survived the great purge and a few CDs that I have bought because it was cheaper to buy the CD (usually with accompanying mp3) than to buy the mp3 alone. However, the bulk of the music I purchase these days is digital. Other than that, I stream a lot off of Amazon Unlimited, to see what I want to spend my limited dollars on to actually own.
I have used music magazines and websites, word of mouth, nights spent chasing a rabbit down a hole on Youtube, suggestions from Amazon, recommendations from artists I like on who they listen to, etc
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Hi! O, good topic!
Usually I find new composers, artists, or just great tunes on YouTube or as recommended by friends.
But sometimes I use soundcloud for it.
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I listen mostly online, Youtube or Spotify (trying to make sure the artist get royalties ;p)

When I really really appreciate a piece of music and is available, I buy it on vinyl. Listening to a vinyl record is for me a moment where I dive into the music and do nothing else
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I have a bit of an aversion to vinyl. I grew up with it and i too well remember literally playing the groves out of some of my favorite records because I played them so much.
I do, however, miss those ole 12 x12 inch record covers with the cool covers.
Oh those record covers were true works of art!

I also remember those records that were made from the hard kind of plastic that could shatter and break when dropped. When they got scratched there was nothing you could do about it! It was so easy to accidentally scratch them . Those phonograph needles wore out too and needed replacement periodically. Experts say that the clarity of sound was best on these these records,

But CDs have their own issues, they easily scratch and warp, those with the plastic covers all seem to break.
Ever have tapes? When one ever got all tangled , it was quite the production to try to straighten then roll around the spool and hope it was okay.I used to tape record many shows from radio .
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Oh those record covers were true works of art!

I also remember those records that were made from the hard kind of plastic that could shatter and break when dropped. When they got scratched there was nothing you could do about it! It was so easy to accidentally scratch them . Those phonograph needles wore out too and needed replacement periodically. Experts say that the clarity of sound was best on these these records,

But CDs have their own issues, they easily scratch and warp, those with the plastic covers all seem to break.
Ever have tapes? When one ever got all tangled , it was quite the production to try to straighten then roll around the spool and hope it was okay.I used to tape record many shows from radio .
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Yeah )))) I also found the period when we listened to music on audio tapes. We were careful about the magnetic tape and the design of the cassette. The head of the tape recorder was wiped. If the cassette was torn, we glued the tape with special glue or thin pieces of a similar 
magnetic tape :)O! I also remember how exciting it was to record my own music disc from my computer. I worked as a stage director at the time, and I had a special bag for the disks. My wealth ))))

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