Do You Like To Whistle? | Coursera Community

Do You Like To Whistle?


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Do you enjoy whistling a tune or even a symphony?

Do you prefer to whistle rather than sing?

Do you often find yourself whistling without realizing you were?

When do you whistle?

I just read something disturbing about whistling. “The only person who enjoys the sound of whistling is the whistler.”

Do you agree?

Let’s talk about whistling.🎶😀


46 replies

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Hi @Judith

That’s an interesting topic to start the day!

I am not a good whistler. My whistles are very weak and I can’t produce many notes with them. But I like to hear if someone else whistles a very nice tune or song (not a symphony though!).

Since my whistles are weak, I prefer singing.

I’m not an avid whistler, so not much. But yes, many people whistle beautiful tunes without realizing, and it’s amazing to listen to them!

I only try whistling, since I can’t produce tunes. But yes, sometimes I do it to myself, just for fun.

I think that the whistler definitely enjoys whistling. And some people may find whistling rude. So from that perspective, some may not enjoy others whistling. But I think that if we put that thought aside and just listen to it as a form of art (music), we can appreciate it a lot more. It is quite a talent to be able to whistle in proper tune and produce music simply by whistling! I think some artists have even released albums on whistling, though I’m not sure.

Thanks!

Userlevel 7
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Interesting topic. but I wonder it could be used against me someday. personal info I mean.

I find myself whistling sometimes why not. a known song / but often following the same pattern of playing with words, as I like to play with sounds which follow rhythms, sometimes this is the way I sing especially playing with my animal (lalala)

sometimes I can find so’ else’s whistling annoying as for it may concern with seduction, but other times that may be a characteristic feature of a known person and I personally enjoy it

Userlevel 6
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Do you enjoy whistling a tune or even a symphony?

Do you prefer to whistle rather than sing?

Do you often find yourself whistling without realizing you were?

When do you whistle?

I just read something disturbing about whistling. “The only person who enjoys the sound of whistling is the whistler.”

Do you agree?

Let’s talk about whistling.🎶😀

Whistling

What an interesting topic @Judith 

Equally amazing responses @Archisha Bhar  @ATP 

I personally like to whistle and nowadays even try to brush up on the skills by practicing symphonies with it.

Maynot be a pro but not too bad at it though.

I prefer to do it when I am home or with my buddies especially with no strangers around.

It creates unnecessary drama even when it is artistically expressed.

When birds do it, we call it singing !

It is actually a form of communication that still persists in many parts of the world.

The myths and legends of sirens are some of the things that affect the perception of the same across various cultures.

The disturbing trend is the wolf whistles especially guys sending inappropriate vibes with it.

Of Course those sick people enjoy doing it.

With all such things around,I have reached a conclusion and understood the best practice is to choose who you are letting to judge or criticise the choices you make and what you are doing with the abilities you possess and trying to enhance. It's all about the perspective that shapes the mindset of the individuals.

So my message to all would be Just be careful and treasure your skills.Things will surely work out someday,someway.

Regards,

Saheli

Userlevel 7
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@sahelibasu23 you made me think people may whistle their own music:

we recently had a discussion starting with a complain, for the student could not catch up with european music standards, blaming the course was too western-centered -- without considering enough, in my H opinion, that I personally have some trouble too at playing Bach without having ever studied years at a music academy; 

so I imagined you whistling a sitar solo :D  

Do people of the world just whistle their own regional music? Media massification made the same genres spread everywhere, just changing the national language, so it’s a globalization of the whistling too?

 

 

 

    

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Well, I think music is a universal language, so it’s the same for whistling. What do you say, @ATP?

Whistling can sound beautiful. Listen to Debussy’s Clair de Lune performed by a whistler!

 

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That’s amazing, @Judith. Especially with the piano accompaniment.

Userlevel 7
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@Archisha Bhar d e c C G

Userlevel 7
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@Judith Your video made me think to how animals developed a complex language where we can only see a monotonous verse.

But are mermaids globalized too?  

@Archisha Bhar , @ATP , you mentioned whistling as a form of communication in addition to a form of music. 

There are places in the world, like Northern Turkey or parts of the Canary Islands where people learn whistling as a language. Because of how spread out the population is, a whistle can travel far. They don’t need cellphones, just their whistles. They sound like songbirds, who probably join their conversations. I have always used a special whistle to call my dogs.

As for Mermaids,you might need to consult with whales or dolphins about this. 🙂

I think most of us have agreed that a beautiful whistle is a significant musical expression.

Userlevel 6
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Yes, @ATP and @Judith. Whistling also serves as a mode of communication, especially for animals, who do not communicate by “words”.

At the end of the day. I think, whistling is a form of an expression, similar to words, music, poetry, dance, literature, or any other form of expression.

As a matter of fact, the intention behind the action should be looked at, and not only the action itself. If someone is whistling, we need to see if that person is producing a beautiful melody, or teasing and being rude intentionally. This can help us judge the actions properly instead of assuming that whistling (or any other thing) is bad. This is true for anything else you can think of.

What do you think?

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In a certain movie, a Mermaid who fell in love with a human, and is living as a human, is asked her name in her language and she squeals it out making televisors and windows burst. 

If one of the people from the countries said ** by @Judith would use their own communication system in our context, we would not understand or even misunderstand it as unpolite -- or report them as “people with a bird’s head” like it happened centuries ago.

** (I read something like this but don’t remember details, talking about people living on the hills that used a similar form of communication even to combine a marriage from one hill to another!)

It can be the same with gestures: the OK gesture has an obscene meaning in France, and what it could appear rude to you, is welcomed by other women. 

@Archisha Bhar  What I mean, is that any signal has to be contextualized. Because if I write “d e c C G” you may just see some letters, while people like Judith perhaps got the hint. Did you?

@Archisha Bhar , I agree that intention is important, but sometimes , when people whistle, it is an unconscious act. I don’t think people stop to think what they will whistle or when. It spontaneously happens sometimes. ( unlike the video)

If someone’s whistle is annoying to you but pleasing to him/her, would you ask the person to stop whistling? Does whistling annoy you?

@ATP , I appreciate how well-versed in movies you are, and as a result  have “encountered “ many good examples to use here.

Of particular interest is how diverse communication can be, how many possibilities and meanings can be interpreted, how a small musical phrase can mean so much more than 5 notes. My favorite musical movie phrase, by the way, is the 2 note theme from Jaws, whenever the shark approaches.

Possibilities of whistling are endless...

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No, @ATP, I didn’t get the “d e c C G”. I meant what I said as my own interpretation of whistling etc.

@Judith, I think when people whistle subconsciously, they usually don’t mean anything bad. They just do it to themselves, like humming.

@Archisha Bhar , I agree with you, that the intention the whistler has is to please him/herself. . It seems like an unconscious act sometimes to burst into a whistle. I take long walks every day and always hum or think music to myself as I walk. If I were a better whistler, perhaps I would whistle instead.It’s very pleasing to produce music that you’re feeling at the time. But it’s personal pleasure. The question that baffled me was, does it bother others? Do you get annoyed when someone is whistling something that you perhaps don’t like or they whistle the same snippet over and over, which people sometimes do? The whistler is happy, but are you?🙂

@Archisha Bhar , @ATP created a better video so I deleted the one I had here.I was just looking to find the music, but his is definitely better.😀

 

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Yes it does annoy me a lot on my nerves

I guess Archisha meant, when someone is in that positive mood and whistling, it can't be annoying, because that whistling is saying: "Everything will go fine, just be positive". So you get it and relax too. 

When it's something like performance well it may turn something different and appear presumptuous, sexualized therefore competitive. Sounds like "Me winner, you loser".

This is the big difference

---

Of course @Archisha Bhar you didn't know that sequence, but it's perhaps the most iconic in terms of "Music as a Universal Language": all the movie is built upon that idea. 

However (which was my real message), if we are grown up under different cultural blocks, we refer to different cultural memes, so actually you could not get my joke.   

It’s a very good movie, if you find the time watch it. 

@Judith  I think you could not post a worst video; my fav soundtrack instead is from Starlite Starbrite also know as The Last Starfighter

 

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You’re right, @Judith. After reading your interpretation, I think I’ll rephrase my thoughts.

I think we need to understand the intention as well as the situation, or culture (as correctly mentioned by ATP).

Thanks for the video, @ATP. I’ll make sure to watch it! :relaxed:

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What about Taxi calling?

Is whistle-calling still considered rude and masculine only?

Userlevel 6
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I have seen them only in movies, @ATP.

I think as long as it doesn’t mean any harm to anyone, whistling is OK. Depends on who is hearing.

@ATP and @Archisha Bhar , Do you think whistling is acceptable more if you are male? Do more males whistle?

Calling for a taxi or calling my dog home isn’t music, or is it?😀

Userlevel 6
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I was thinking the same thing, @Judith. But these days, I think females are also letting go of their shyness and coming out of the stereotypes (which is great!).

The main thing I was having on my mind was that, some males might indicate rude whistles towards females, which is bad. But since our focus is on music, like the video you shared, it is definitely a work of art, and should be seen as one. Again, it depends on the listener.

Userlevel 7
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@Judith  I think calling a taxi is a conventional SIGNAL which is meant to be understood by the widest range of taxi-drivers, so there is no much room for a personalization. 

Calling a personal member of a family, animals included, instead implies an expression of affection and, while it not necessarily forms a "melody" properly said, always tends to convey an emotion through TONES. That's also what nicknames are meant for.

@Archisha Bhar  -- "these days, I think females are also letting go of their shyness"

Please let me point out "these days" sounds like an humiliation than a victory. Cretan women could go around breast open being this not offensive to anyone nor an invitation to violence, until someone decided that women had to be the prize for obedience, transforming women in a silent fetish. 

Farmer's daughter whistling at horses, or a Newyorker woman calling a taxi, may be picturesque images of an emancipated woman, but it's an illusion within a culture that still has to get rid of superstitious stereotypes.

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Yes, @ATP, I completely agree with you that women in those days acted that way. What I meant is that, as you mentioned that after a certain time, someone decided that women had to be the prize for obedience, transforming women in a silent fetish; my “these days” mean the days after women were silenced etc. So that’s the timeline I meant.

Let’s not get derailed from our main topic though, which was music :wink:

 

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