Book Club: What are your favorite textbooks on Life Sciences & Health? | Coursera Community
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Book Club: What are your favorite textbooks on Life Sciences & Health?

  • 24 September 2020
  • 11 replies
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Userlevel 7
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Hello everyone,

Following the conversation with @Lillian and @ele81946 in the other thread related to this topic here: 

 and the enquiries in the background, I decided to start this thread: 

One of my favorite books on Molecular Biology and Genetics is Molecular Biology of The Cell by Alberts et al. It has been used as the essential one in most universities for this topic and it covers so much from basics to applications for the subject.

Another good classic one is Vander’s Human Physiology by Widmaier et al. for Human physiology topics. 

How about you? Do you have any favorite textbooks on Life Sciences or Health topics? I would love to hear from you too. Thank you.


11 replies

Userlevel 6
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at 6, I was gifted a human anatomy scale model, with detailed bones and organs, which was the base for many useful nightmares in the years on 

Userlevel 3
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 Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology

 Robbins Basic Pathology

 Clinically Oriented Anatomy …...

Userlevel 7
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Thank you @ATP for sharing your experience with anatomy model! It looks like someone in your family saw the intellectual gifting in you and tried to encourage you to go for Medical School. :grin: Perhaps, it was not your interest? :blush:

Userlevel 7
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Thanks so much @Hadi Abbas for those books. I will check them out. I think Grey’s Anatomy is still one of the popular ones too: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gray%27s_Anatomy 

Any more books?

Userlevel 6
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@Denise Well you may hint me on a personal issue, but I don't feel put it that way. 

The anatomic scale model I got was one of the most significative tools I ever could deal with. For many reasons I didn't become a Surgeon, however, in my personal flood, I could develop a fundamental technical insight along with artistic skills; 

You know children need to touch things, rather than concepts; Actually Human anatomy is perhaps one of the best intros to system complexity, and someway to empathy: Children want to know such things like air (you may also ever heard of Halloween), and we had a famous cartoon series on physiological mechanisms, seen from the point of view of cells-like-workmen, just targeting children. 

You also make me think to a short SF novel "Child's Play" (1947) by William Tenn, narrating about a Little Chemist's set to build real living humans, used by children of a far future, that mistakenly is delivered to an everyday man. ( https://epdf.pub/william-tenn-childs-play.html )

That's why I didn't mention a real book, even if I had various atlases on general human health issues, still I would rather quote my guide to regional flowers and mushrooms.

Thanks

Userlevel 7
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@ATP , it sounds like you have valuable gifts and interests in several different areas. Have you seen this thread on discovering your passion?: 

Perhaps, it could help you to determine which one is the most interesting for you to pursue if you have not decided about it yet?

Thank you for mentioning the novel “Child’s Play,” I hadn’t heard of it. I will try and check it out. 

If you know any good textbooks on Flowers or Mushrooms, please feel free to led us know. We had a beautiful thread in the Mentor Training Course Forums quite a while ago on flowers where many had shared a photo of some interesting plant or flower. We even made it a game, trying to guess what it was from the photo. It was great fun, bonding many of the Mentor Community. If you wish to start such a thread, please feel free to do so too. I still have some nice photos from some botanical gardens visited that I could share there… :blush:

I know some friends who are so much into surviving in the wild without anything like in Ray Mears ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_Mears ) programs. I am sure they would appreciate some good textbooks on mushrooms to differentiate edible ones from poisonous ones. I hear that it’s not that easy to tell them apart at times when they share similar colors. Certainly, wouldn’t wish to risk…  :grin:

Userlevel 6
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@Denise - Unfortunately I recently freed that very book into pieces; as for recognizing edible mushrooms, yes, some species show too recurrent features (Russulae and Amanitae) to be sure, so why taking the risk. I myself had some extreme adventures in the wild and that can be fun or nightmare. Once in countryside the temperature lowed so much that I would have had real troubles if I didn’t have the good idea to camp outside a farm. So when I had enough I found a hole right at my back and enter to wrap myself in sacks. Extreme luck. My hero in teens was Chuck Yeager tough.

I wish you could now start that thread yourself. Naturalistic plant drawing was in my veins in childhood, along with Anatomy -- maybe I could post a scribble and ask what’s that organ?  

Userlevel 7
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Thank you @ATP for the flowers thread suggestion. One of the very Life Sciences enthusiasts @Lillian had started that wonderful thread in the Mentor Portal Forums. @Maryam , @Clarise , @Judith and @lkhan were among the major contributors. Let’s see if any of them are interested in starting such a thread here as well… :wink:

With your experience in the countryside, perhaps you may look into a thread on that topic? Surviving the wilderness, sharing adventures perhaps? :relaxed:

Wow, Chuck Yeager ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chuck_Yeager ) certainly a very impressive role model indeed especially for everyone who wish to be a pilot. Thank you for reminding us such an admirable person.   

Userlevel 6
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@Denise It’s a nice suggestion, people use to list visited countries, but never tell any adventure. “I queued two hours at the museum” or “I found a fly in my dish (of grasshoppers)”. Would you suggest for that thread to hint on a specific reflection on the past adventure?

By studying my dreams, it emerged that behavioral models tend to be infinite. Each person we dream of --- and each thing as well, represent a specific projection of ourselves. At last, the mother is the very basic model we start from, so everything in the dream is Mom. The abstraction of this principle took me to conclude that everyone is model to themselves, in that an harmonic development makes us transform our world and explore new ways: Who can really be a model in the unexplored? That’s why it’s important for students never to be forced to put apart their “distraction” because it is right there where they would find the spirit to go on in the troubles. 

Userlevel 3
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 @Denise  you’re welcome and I hope you will benefit from those books.

Personally, I haven't used Grey’s Anatomy but it is well known and praised.

Userlevel 7
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@ATP “RE: your Q above: Would you suggest for that thread to hint on a specific reflection on the past adventure?”

 

Why not? :slight_smile: You can decide on the theme and direction of your threads. You can suggest a few different directions in your starting post, then the contributors could decide which part to comment on. All the best. 

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