Osteoarchaeology: The Truth in Our Bones – What did you learn? | Coursera Community
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Osteoarchaeology: The Truth in Our Bones – What did you learn?

  • 23 August 2019
  • 5 replies
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Osteoarchaeology: The Truth in Our Bones – What did you learn?
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The course of the week is Osteoarchaeology: The Truth in Our Bones taught by Leiden University.

@Claire and I are hoping that together we can help people find great courses through the community. Every week, we're featuring a course and inviting people who have taken the course to share their course highlights and how they're using what they learned.

Have you taken Osteoarchaeology: The Truth in Our Bones?

What did you like about it?

What were the key skills and knowledge you gained from the course?

Who would benefit from taking this course?

What have you done with what you learned?

5 replies

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Have you taken Osteoarchaeology: The Truth in Our Bones? YES

What did you like about it? I knew little to nothing about the topic and was curious to learn more

What were the key skills and knowledge you gained from the course? I learned that when I come across issues related to skeletons et al, I WILL GO GET AN EXPERT: I know enough to be dangerous but would be a disaster if I had to really dig in!

Who would benefit from taking this course? Anyone with intellectual curiosity

What have you done with what you learned? Looked at applying this to investing in biotech startups
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This course was instrumental in my Forensic Anthropology learning. I suggest anyone with an interest in archaeaology take this course.
Such a pity the mentors, especially the very dedicated Sheila, were removed by the university!
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I took Osteoarchaeology: The Truth in Our Bones and found it one of the best MOOC courses I have ever taken. I learned How to identify gender age and many other things based on the info and images of the bones provided during class. Unfortunately, I have no opportunities right now to use these new abilities. I can only hope to get a scholarship and start a PhD in the area. It is my dream. Since I work in the environmental sector, I can now manage our archaeological contracts more safely.

Juliana Lira de Andrade
Marine Biologist/Filmmaker/Science comunicator
Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil
Userlevel 3
Such a pity the mentors, especially the very dedicated Sheila, were removed by the university!

The decision had nothing to do with the quality of all mentors, including Sheila. All mentors received praise, as they should. We were one of the first universities to recognize the value of volunteers and offering them support from 2013 until March 1st 2019. Our discontinuation was on principle, not because we were not valuing our volunteers.

We came to the conclusion that there were two main issues:
  1. Our volunteers increasingly were taking on jobs that ought to be paid. If this gap of content moderation existed, then maintaining a volunteer network to cover it stood in the way of a solution. Instead we believe that all teaching teams should be as active as a matter of principle in courses they create. Especially if there is revenue generated.
  2. Teaching teams ought to be active themselves in the communities they create. They lead on content. This means that if a teacher leaves the university, there is a continuity issue that the university is responsible for and should fix. You can see that being a problem in many a course.
In addition there were data privacy issues with the ways we kept in contact with learners (Facebook) and mentors (Slack) that on the basis of European privacy laws (GDPR) and data ethics principles we signed up for could not be maintained. In sum, the volunteer programme was no longer something we could take responsibility for.

If you wish to debate any of these issues feel free to reach out to me at mooc@sea.leidenuniv.nl.

I hope you continue to enjoy https://www.coursera.org/learn/truthinourbones-osteoarchaeology-archaeology.

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