Can we practise writing short paragraphs or just a sentence each time and learn from one other here? | Coursera Community

Can we practise writing short paragraphs or just a sentence each time and learn from one other here?

  • 7 February 2021
  • 47 replies
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Is this possible or this forum is not for practice session?


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I think we can practice our English skills here too... This could be considered as the informal way of practising English skills. ☺

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Okay then @Nawanis let’s make a start.

A topic sentence is usually the first sentence in a paragraph. It tells the reader what the paragraph is about. Each topic sentence has two elements: Topic and Purpose.

Note this first example. War is bad. What’s wrong with this topic sentence?

Any idea?

 

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Okay then @Nawanis let’s make a start.

A topic sentence is usually the first sentence in a paragraph. It tells the reader what the paragraph is about. Each topic sentence has two elements: Topic and Purpose.

Note this first example. War is bad. What’s wrong with this topic sentence?

Any idea?

 

Hi @Inise,

Can I join your discussion too? Your idea sounds interesting.

For your question, I think this sentence doesn’t have a Purpose. The sentence ends abruptly. It could have been something like, War is bad for humanity. Am I on the right track?

Thanks!

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Hi @Archisha Bhar , of course you can join the discussion.

You are on the right track. For an effective topic sentence, know your topic, the subject of your paragraph. Choose one that is narrow but still allows for development. For example, teens and their cell phones. It provides a simple topic that you can develop. In addition to the subject, you need a purpose to explain what the paragraph will say about the topic. For example, War is bad for humanity, as you suggested or teens are addicted to their cell phones. In the latter example, the paragraph will show addictive behaviour.

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Can we try another topic sentence?

I ate bananas yesterday. It is a nice statement, but what’s wrong with this topic sentence?

Again, any idea?

Userlevel 7
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Can we try another topic sentence?

I ate bananas yesterday. It is a nice statement, but what’s wrong with this topic sentence?

Again, any idea?

This one is a bit tricky. Is it because the it is not mentioned for what the person ate bananas? Like, I ate bananas yesterday for breakfast? Or, constructing a little better, Yesterday, I ate bananas for breakfast? Otherwise, it sounds as if the person ate only bananas the whole day! (Which is not the case, I believe!).

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Thank you @Archisha Bhar .

I ate bananas yesterday is too narrow, meaning once you tell the reader how many bananas you ate, there is really nothing else to say.

Very well, our last topic sentence is: This paragraph will be about student fears. Again, what’s wrong with this topic sentence?

 

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Thank you @Archisha Bhar .

I ate bananas yesterday is too narrow, meaning once you tell the reader how many bananas you ate, there is really nothing else to say.

Very well, our last topic sentence is: This paragraph will be about student fears. Again, what’s wrong with this topic sentence?

 

I must say your questions are pretty challenging, @Inise!

I think the word fears doesn’t quite go with the rest of the sentence.

Maybe we can write, This paragraph will be about the fears students have, or, This paragraph will be about what students fear.  Otherwise, the word fears at the end of the sentence sounds like a verb rather than a noun, which results in the sentence sounding incomplete.

Another guess is, putting the object of fear as well, like exams or teachers.

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Wow good try @Archisha Bhar .

This paragraph will be about student fears. This is an announcement and the reader has no idea what you want to say about fears - what your purpose is.

Awaiting one from you @Archisha Bhar  or anyone else would like to join the discussion.

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Wow good try @Archisha Bhar .

This paragraph will be about student fears. This is an announcement and the reader has no idea what you want to say about fears - what your purpose is.

Awaiting one from you @Archisha Bhar  or anyone else would like to join the discussion.

Good one, @Inise!

Sure, I’ll also give questions as soon as I collect some.

Take care

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Hello @Archisha Bhar and anyone else who would like to join the practice session. I learned this line from Learning How to Learn course - Practice makes Permanent.

Shall we continue?

There are four types of sentences: simple, compound, complex and compound-complex.

What type of sentence is this and why do you say so?

I walked around the block’ or ‘This morning, I walked around the block’.

Any idea?

 

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Hi @Inise. Welcome back!

I had also taken that course. It’s wonderful. have you tried Mindshift by the same instructor?

For your answer, it’s a simple sentence.

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Hi @Archisha Bhar,

That’s the right answer, it’s a simple sentence. Simple sentences contain only one independent clause.

Next one. We could go to the beach, or we could go up to the mountains.

What type of sentence is this and why?

 

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Thanks, @Inise.

This one is a compound sentence.

Here, we have two simple sentences, We could go to the beach and we could go up to the mountains. These are connected by the conjunction, or. These kinds of sentences contain more than one subjects or predicates. The conjunctions like andor, but, or a “,” are commonly used. These are basically connectors connecting two or more independent sentences.

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Thanks @Archisha Bhar and thank you too for explaining the reason you chose compound sentence. Yes, compound sentence is the right answer.

Last one on the types of sentences:

We could go to the beach, or we could go up to the mountains since it might rain on the coast.

What type of sentence is this one and why?

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Thanks @Inise.

This is a compound-complex sentence.

This is because, here, we have two independent clauses (We could go to the beach and we could go up to the mountains) and one dependent clause (since it might rain on the coast). This forms a compound-complex sentence.

We could go to the beach is a simple sentence, and we could go up to the mountains since it might rain on the coast is a complex sentence ( one dependent and one independent clause) joined by the conjunction, or.

Regards.

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Thanks genius @Archisha Bhar .

That was a compound-complex sentence and thanks too for the explanation to support your answer.

Shall we try commas? At times, I’m still confused where to place comma(s) in a sentence. Here are 4 sentences, please put the comma at the right place within each sentence.

  1. At the market yesterday I bought fresh vegetables for dinner.
  2. When the police arrive tell them that the thief ran away but left the money and jewels behind.
  3. In the morning the dolphins like to swim near the surfers and play with them.
  4. One of the students in this class should make a study guide but it will take a lot of time.

 

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You’re awesome, @Inise:relaxed:

Here are your answers:

  1. At the market yesterday, I bought fresh vegetables for dinner.
  2. When the police arrive, tell them that the thief ran away, but left the money and jewels behind.
  3. In the morning, the dolphins like to swim near the surfers and play with them.
  4. One of the students in this class should make a study guide, but it will take a lot of time.
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Well done @Archisha Bhar

  1. Yes
  2. Remember the rule, comma before conjunction followed by subject and verb. An example shown in no.4.
  3. Yes
  4. Yes

Next one. Can you remember the main 8 parts of speech? What are they?

Some words in English can be more than one part of the speech. For example, one word can be used as a noun, verb, adverb, adjective and so on. Would you like to try out these 7 words? Round, spin, run, daily, down, up and well.

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Thanks @Inise

Round - Adjective

Spin - Verb

Run - Verb

Daily - Adverb

Down - Adverb

Up - Adverb

Well - Adverb

This time it was a bit confusing. I had learned English grammar a long time ago, so I have forgotten some things. :sweat_smile:

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Thank you again @Archisha Bhar.

Let me try these words in simple sentences.

Round

Look at that round cake. (adjective)

The round-about takes a lot of space. (noun)

Round up the cows. (verb)

Spin

Let me spin that around. (verb)

The dog’s name is Spin. (noun)

Run

I will run to the shop. (verb)

He hit a home run. (noun)

Daily

It was in the Daily News. (noun)

It is a daily chore. (adjective)

Down

He is feeling down. (adjective)

He lives down the road. (adverb)

Up

He walked up the hill. (adverb)

An up-coming event. (adjective)

Well

We stopped by the well for a brief rest. (noun)

Well! (interjection)

He does his job well. (adverb)

For now and I’ll return with another exercise.  

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That was very informative, @Inise!

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Hello, how’s everyone?

@Archisha Bhar and those who may be interested to join us. Shall we try some guidelines on business communication when using email? Let’s begin with Tone which is made up of formal and informal language, and direct and indirect language. Tone is important because if you don’t get it right you might sound rude or unprofessional.

Identify from the following list which ones are formal and those that are informal:

  • at your convenience
  • by the way
  • discuss
  • for your information
  • I appreciate
  • thanks
  • things
  • inform you
  • opportunity
  • regarding
  • request

Identify from the following list which ones are direct and those that are indirect:

  • Can I….?
  • Could you..?
  • Please let me…?
  • It will be late.
  • Would I be able to….?
  • Would it be possible for you to….?
  • Would you be able to let me….?
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Welcome back, @Inise.

Below are the answers:

Formal:

  • at your convenience
  • discuss
  • for your information
  • I appreciate
  • inform you
  • opportunity
  • regarding
  • request

Informal:

  • by the way
  • thanks
  • things

Direct:

  • Can I…?
  • It will be late.

Indirect:

  • Could you…?
  • Please let me…?
  • Would I be able to…?
  • Would it be possible for you to…?
  • Would you be able to let me…?

Regards.

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Thank you @Archisha Bhar, you deserve your title.

Formal:

 

  • at your convenience
  • discuss
  • I appreciate
  • inform you
  • opportunity
  • regarding
  • request

Informal:

  • by the way
  • for your information - short form ‘fyi
  • thanks
  • things

Direct:

  • Can I….?
  • Could you..?
  • Please let me…?
  • It will be late.

Indirect:

  • Would I be able to….?
  • Would it be possible for you to….?
  • Would you be able to let me….

Thanks again and will be back with more.

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